Monday, January 02, 2012

What Have We Learned about Training in over 70 years? [VIDEO]

My favorite design thinker Dan Roam posted a YouTube video on how a Differential System works on cars. I was blown away by the quality of the video and how confident I felt in understanding the complex system of a differential. After watching the video I noticed other videos in that right hand column of YouTube and so I watched another training video.

The videos I watched are in this post. Do me a favor. Watch them both and tell me your immediate gut reaction. Also, tell me if you had prior knowledge of the topic before viewing these videos.

What do they have in common?  Can you see, or simply sense, a particular learning model?  Or template?  Or format?  What about the development technology?  Did it one work better than the other? What about the scripting?  Put yourself in the shoes of the instructional designers.  What methods does it look like they used to design and develop this training?  Better yet, is this even training at all?
Ready? Go!
 

12 comments:

Georgiy Mogelashvili said...

As for me, second video is more confident than the first one because it shows real differential in work and I can watch the whole evolution from spokes to gears.
But still both videos are well done and easy to understand.

Brent Schlenker said...

I had the same feelings. I really enjoyed "the whole evolution from spokes to gears" as well. And I think I should also be clear in saying that I think both videos were well done.
I am mostly fascinated in the design decisions of each one. I can VERY closely relate with both videos, but from different perspectives. My Media Arts degree/background is mostly interested in the 1937 film while my EdTech corporate Training experience relates with the 2011 video. I designed a few of those during my time in corp.training and I can practically sense how the entire process must have gone.
In finding gems like this one from 1937 I wonder if we couldn't simply redo it with today's graphics technology. I'd like to see what a blending of these 2 videos might look like.

Megan Gesing said...

I agree that both of these videos are very well done.

My rule here at work is if we can see it with a camera, it doesn't need to be animated. Sometimes I think the graphics pull the concept out of a real world application.

That being said, I loved the 1937 video. A modern version could benefit from arrows and call outs, but I prefer this style.

Brent Schlenker said...

Hi Megan! Thanks for your feedback. I was shocked to even see arrows and lines at all in the 1937 video. I think you're right that it could have used more, but to see any sort of graphics in the intro really made me take notice.
I think most people will take that for granted. But understanding that graphics were not easy to create back in 1937 really changes your perspective.
We've come a long way in 70 years.

Anonymous said...

I felt that the first one gave me the information I needed a lot quicker than the older video. They both do the job though.

Tiger Squadron said...

The 3D video was done on a very low budget and was part of a full-day training program for teaching sales consultants the basics of Trucks. It was part of a pretty exhaustive curriculum so was done for brevity. 3D was used for budget purposes.

Tiger Squadron said...

Oh, incidentally since the blog is e-learning, this is our dealer training iPad application: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/2012-camry/id490725213?ls=1&mt=8

Brent Schlenker said...

Hi Tiger Squadron! Thanks for commenting. You sound like the creator of the Toyota training. Nice job. The circumstances of every training project are always numerous and diverse. Better understanding the background of a project is always enlightening and helpful to our eLearning peers. Thanks for sharing! I'd like to chat with you offline of you are the creator. Thanks!

Brent Schlenker said...

Hi Tiger Squadron! Thanks for commenting. You sound like the creator of the Toyota training. Nice job. The circumstances of every training project are always numerous and diverse. Better understanding the background of a project is always enlightening and helpful to our eLearning peers. Thanks for sharing! I'd like to chat with you offline of you are the creator. Thanks!

Tiger Squadron said...

Yes, it's a quirk of my account that it's my airshow team name but my company is Curved Space Creative and I created that video for a program called "Truck Essentials" which also included the "how an engine works" animation. I was very unhappy with the animator so used a different animator for the safety system videos that you can also see on my Youtube channel (the allegroracing one). Truck Essentials was an EIGHT HOUR course...it was a case of "covering" too much information so I was really trying to keep things short and simple. Since that course was done in 2007, they've way paired down and shortened those courses because they realized you just can't saturate someone that much for that long.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for sharing this post for training...
Corporate Training

Brent Schlenker said...

I found the Curved Space Creative web site. So I can contact you from there. Thanks again for sharing/connecting.